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Are Your CTAs In The Right Place? Quick Experiment Might Give You A 40% Jump.

I tracked CTA conversions placed at several places for several landing pages, and here's what I found so far.

  1. Top Navbar (With hamburger menu on phones):

Reason:

A friend of mine opened up the hamburger menu (for a different MVP) and clicked on it instead of the big button at the hero section. When asked, the answer given was it felt like less of a commitment than clicking a big button which might make her signup or pay.

Expectation:

Fidgety users open up the hamburger to take the action or suddenly feel like it's less of a commitment (also keep in mind the CTA text was the same and included the word "free").

Reality:

Interestingly for this site, she didn't click on the hamburger icon and directly used the hero action. Was this because she knew I wanted her to do the action? Was it because she saw a similar landing page in the other application and didn't want to explore it? I'm not sure. But it can't hurt you to have one extra CTA in your nav links.

  1. Hero Section:

Reason:

I believe users like to be free from distractions. Any enterprise site has 1000 links which can easily confuse the user, and I didn't want this which I figured from over-engineering previous applications.

Expectation:

Users would look at the prompt in the hero section (mostly accompanied by a catchy title like "Got Milk?" with a video /gif of the product in action) and instantly be convinced to convert.

Reality:
Most of the clicks to my surprise weren't from this section. Users want to see more value before they take an action. There is pretty much a standard template for landing pages to deliver maximum value that everyone uses (Comment below if you missed it) which heavily relies on this button.

However, this result varied between different domains. It worked great for fintech not so much for app downloads.

  1. Bottom of each page:

Reason:
The reason was pretty simple, I included one extra CTA at the bottom instead of relying on just the top one just because I wanted to fill up some space.

Expectation:
None.

Reality:
40% jump in click-through rates! I was seriously surprised I had to check my code to see if I had mismatched the tracking IDs.

  1. Bottom Nav Bar (Only for phones):

Reason:
The phone heatmap includes a top navbar in the area that's not reached by most users.

Expectation:
Users would use the bottom nav bar as opposed to the bottom of the page CTA.

Reality:
When questioned I couldn't get proper answers to why this wasn't chosen by mobile users, but only 4% of the users used it.

  1. Hyperlinks between explanation texts:

Reason:
Every landing page has some explainer text, why not include a hyperlink there to the same action?

Expectation:
None

Reality:
2% clicks. This might be because I had given them a briefing about the app already and after viewing the gif they weren't ready to read any text. (Speculation)

Verdict & Learnings:

  • Your Mileage May Vary: CTA placement strategy for one market (fintech) might not work out great for another market (Technology Apps)

  • Place them strategically in places where you wouldn't expect a big popup/pricing /auth-wall.

  • Keyword experimenting does matter, but what worked out best for me was Atlassian's famous "Get it free" across a lot of landing pages.

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