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Founding team member/co-founder role at a profitable, fast-growing startup

If you enjoy the process of creating something from scratch but loathe the risk of nobody wanting that thing, or know anyone who does, read on. Otherwise please click the "back" button and accept my apology for taking 5s of your time.

Who we are:

We build a SaaS product that serves the niche market of 3D printing hobbyists. We are looking for our first full time hire because we are literally overwhelmed by all the things our users ask us to do. We are open to offering co-founder-level equity and title if you prove you have the chops.

  • The product-market-fit is validated by thousands of enthusiastic paying customers.
  • $200k+ ARR. Growing at 10% month-over-month clip.
  • Have raised $0. Founders still own 95+% of the company.

Who you are:

  • Hustler. Jack of all trades. Willing to do anything to make things work. And yes it'll include clicking the same button hundreds of times if that's the quickest way to get a thing done.
  • You love calling your own shots. Hate being told what to do, or how to do it.
  • You don't mind that we don't have a moon-shot story to get millions of venture dollars. You are ok with the ambiguity of "let's just grow this thing as fast as we can and see where we land".
  • Familiar with the quirky 3D printing community, or don't mind becoming so.

What we can offer:

  • 100% autonomy. Nobody is your boss. You are.
  • A lot of areas to trailblaze. From content marketing, running social media, leading the user community, to getting help documents in shape. You name it.
  • A salary that is slightly lower than the market rate. A generous equity that beats any other offer you can get. Open to offering co-founder-level equity and title.
  • Countless opportunities to hear users saying "I LOVE your product. I don't know how I can continue my hobby without you. Take my money and tell me how else I can help you be more successful."

Thank you for considering us!

  1. 2

    Hi,
    I quit my job at Microsoft in October 2020 to try my hand at Entrepreneurship. I have hustled with multiple projects since then. I feel I will be a really good value addition to your team.

    1. 1

      Will be happy to chat. Please shoot me an email (can be found in my IH profile).

  2. 1

    Is this still on? I think I would love to chat about this. Let me know :)

  3. 1

    Professional mechanical engineer and 3d printer here that also knows his way around Python.

    Sounds like I'm not the right fit for your full time hire but would love to learn more about the platform you're building!

    Edit: wait a second... Is this for The Spaghetti Detective?! I change my mind I want the job!

  4. 1

    Hi Kenneth,

    I found an email address on your profile, and I hope you don't mind an email directly. I'm interested in what you are offering, and looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thanks.

    1. 1

      Please shoot me an email if you haven't already.

  5. 1

    Looks very interesting. I shot you an email if you want to chat.

  6. 1

    @kennethjiang

    Love how you're immediately filtering the possible audience by telling them to hit the back button.

    This past week I realized that I can use Automation to build massive audiences on social. One of the strategies I'm using now is taking Tiktok videos and republishing them on Pinterest, Facebook, etc. (and attributing the source).

    The reason I bring this up is because I could not get my scraper to scrape the tiktok videos. I'm using Tiktokd.com to download the videos without a watermark (to avoid the IG penalty), but it's a task that requires me to "click the same button hundreds of times if that's the quickest way to get a thing done."

    I don't know anything about 3D printing, but I love the possibilities it opens up in every single industry, which makes me excited to learn more about it.

    Drop me a line if you'd like to chat. [email protected]

  7. 1

    Hi guys, I would love to hear your story, I'm a growth marketer so I think I can share some good ideas with you. Let me know

    1. 2

      It's funny that, after reading so many books, blogposts, and listening to so many podcasts about startups, I'd attribute the traction we have had to 2 basic things:

      1. Common sense. It's related to what I said in another post about "asking for advice but not taking it". Very often founder's intuition + common sense triumphs fancy advice.

      2. Relentless focus on providing what customers want. It sounds like a no-brainer. But I live in Silicon Valley. And I have seen many founders lost in activities such as talking to investors, joining accelerators, hiring (yes hiring employees before they have customers lol), etc.

      My experience if a founder gets these 2 things right, he/she will get somewhere with a little time and a little bit of luck. Otherwise all the odds are stacked again you.

      1. 1

        Yep, I think you are totally right. Like the way you think.

  8. 1

    Hi, would love to hear more about your previous failures - if you're willing to talk about them.

    1. 2

      Haha of course. I have done a lot of reflection on my failures, and it boils down to 2 things:

      1. I thought I'd build a good business just by following everything in "The Lean Startup", or every piece of advice from the successful people. By doing so I ignored my gut and common sense. My other post touched on this.

      2. Lack of focus on revenue. Revenue is important not (only) because it keeps you afloat, but because it's often the best and only indicator of traction. Indulging ourselves in "xxx customer interviews we have done", "be accepted by xxx accelerator" was what caused us to miss the sign of lack of traction before it was too late.

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