May 5, 2019

Technical front-end founders, how did you create the backend of your Product?

Vincent Liao @vinliao

Hey IH, I'm pretty curious. For those of you who are more interested in front-end development, did you create the backend of your product on your own?

If not, what did you do?

Edit: I'm specifically asking for founders who are just starting out

  1. 3

    I use Firebase's Cloud Firestore, and Firebase Storage. They are WYSIWYG, and I can manually add data to the DB and to the storage. Then, I use one of the many adapters out there to connect FIreabase to my front-end (in my case, Ember.js).

    When I need help with creating back-end scripts, I'll hire someone Upwork to write a very specific Firebase Cloud Function task.

  2. 3

    Assuming that you are familiar with Javascript - Try node. Will be really easy.

  3. 2

    I lean more towards Front-end development, but I take care of everything when building my products. If you're experienced in JavaScript, take a look at Node.js. I either use Netlify functions or https://hapijs.com/ for my backend stack.

  4. 1

    I’ve gone with team Firebase also for my project so that I wouldn’t need a full dev ops team to manage the headaches of a complex backend system.

  5. 1

    As others have said - Firebase was super easy to get started. I also utilized Google Cloud Functions (basically serverless like AWS lambda) so I barely have a headache in terms of my backend

  6. 1

    My decision came down to Firebase: https://firebase.google.com/ or AWS Amplify: https://aws-amplify.github.io/.

    I'm using Amplify for my current project, but that's mainly because I use AWS for my day job. It's been really great so far as long as you stay within the walls of what they intended you to do. It's super easy to spin up certain features, Auth, Storage etc.

    BUT there's a certain amount of lock-in involved, parts of my app are now tightly coupled to AWS so migrating to another backend (if they decided to up their prices) would be a major project.

    You're signing a deal with the devil but trade off it worth it for me, as I suspect I'd get fatigued learning all the backend stuff meaning the app would never get online.

    1. 1

      Everyone seems to be using firebase/amplify. I didn't know that this kind of service exist, looks cool, I will hack around with it.

      But I am a bit confused what amplify actually does though. Is it a javascript framework that makes it easier for people to "add serverless backend" to their app?

  7. 1

    I created a backend myself. I am definitely more interested in frontend but backend is also nice now that we have Javascript there as well :)

    You can read more about my tech stack here: https://www.indiehackers.com/post/83c9da0149

    Would be happy to help if you have any technical questions.

    1. 1

      I'm not actually trying to learn backend, I'm just curious whether front-end devs find it difficult building backend system. I didn't know that there's an easy and good alternative like firebase.

      I was having a "product idea" and would like to verify first whether people have that problem and would like to be desperately solved or not, but firebase is a good alternative for front-end devs, so I'll skip this idea.

      Anyways, speaking of front ends, I'm currently trying to learn react (just picked it up today and did the tic tac toe tuts), any good resource?

      1. 1

        Understood.

        I can only personally recommend Frontend Masters. They are a bit pricey for someone just starting out (luckily my company is paying for it as part of education budget), but they have been an amazing resource so far, a lot of useful content.

        A new version of https://frontendmasters.com/courses/complete-react-v4/ is soon coming out.

        Also, this might interest you (Firebase + React): https://frontendmasters.com/courses/firebase-react-v2/

        I also found the React documentation to be super useful and well laid out, combined with Dan Abramov's blog: https://overreacted.io/

        But yeah, Firebase might be a good choice. It works for IndieHackers :)

        1. 1

          Wow, that's really pricey! I end up choosing learning react with udemy, a course created by Academind.

          But yeah, Firebase might be a good choice. It works for IndieHackers :)

          Yeah, building backend is for frontend folks is easier than I thought. Glad I knew this sooner before working on this project.

          Thanks Ante!

  8. 1

    Hi man, I want to strongly recommend Firebase if you were a front end developer :)