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App makes $3k/mo now. Getting lazy. Time to move on?

My mind is a blank.

Code makes me sick.

I hate coding.

I just want to move to Thailand and chill on a beach with the ladies.

I'd love it if I can sell my app. Or put it on auto-pilot. Or something.

Ever since I started my startup, I've never really had a true vacation where I can just unplug and not check my emails.

It's like a f*cking prison I can't escape from -- there's always some stupid email I have to deal with even when I'm swimming at a beach, skiing down a slope, or hiking up some pristine mountain.

I don't know. Life sucks.

And I'm still way off from the $10k MRR I'm aiming for.

  1. 4

    Congrats on reaching $3k MRR! Sounds like you're exhausted.

    You've just ran a marathon, made it over what you thought was the finish line, and discovered the race never ends. Maybe slow down the pace a little and don't force yourself to code and let the customer support emails wait a few days.

    Read, make music, walk, whatever.

    As many Indiehackers will attest, you're in a fortunate position that may not last forever, so take some time to recharge, soak in your accomplishment, and then aim for the next peak: 10K MRR.

    And, as cheesy as it sounds, practice gratitude. Try recall how the $100 MRR version of you could only imagine having to deal with too many customer support emails.

    TL;DR: Don't be afraid to coast for a while, you've earned it. Good luck!

    1. 2

      Yes, you're right.

      I'm quite exhausted, and in fact I felt a little betrayed that there's just more endless work even after surpassing a few MRR milestones.

      $100 MRR me a year ago would kill to be at this stage. But now I'm here, I just feel like It's neverending work.

      Like hard work will just be rewarded with more work. It never gets easier even as the money gets better.

  2. 4

    Just wanted to drop in and say that I disagree with the notion expressed in this thread that you should be fortunate to be in the position you are in.

    Everybody needs time off at some point. Yes, you've had success ($3k MRR is a success!) but monetary success alone isn't everything. People need time off. You need time off. It helps you recharge and it makes the whole process a lot more enjoyable. It's totally fine that you want it.

    Is there a way you can unplug for a few days? Is it maybe possible to disconnect for a smaller number of days at first? Your business will probably survive if you don't check your emails for three consecutive days. The chances of it blowing up seem pretty low so that might be a first step to getting some you-time.

    By the way, have you read Tim Ferriss' The 4-Hour Workweek? There are a lot of parallels between what you describe in your post and what he describes in his book. If you haven't read it already, you might want to check it out. ;)

    On a closing note: Don't be so hard on yourself when it comes to revenue goals. Going from $150 to $3k MRR in less than a year sounds like you're doing well when it comes to that aspect. :)

    1. 3

      Is there a way you can unplug for a few days? Is it maybe possible to disconnect for a smaller number of days at first?

      Yes, it's definitely doable. But that's not really the point, as I have a habit of checking my email anyway. I've built a brand on stellar customer support, and if I fall back on that I feel like I'll be disappointing so many people. Plus I feel such a strong sense of responsibility towards my paying customers. If my app doesn't do what it promises to do, it's only right that I fix it ASAP, vacation or otherwise.

      Being a solo founder doesn't help either. It's me or nobody.

      On a closing note: Don't be so hard on yourself when it comes to revenue goals. Going from $150 to $3k MRR in less than a year sounds like you're doing well when it comes to that aspect. :)

      Thanks for that, I was struggling so much last year, but I ended the year on a high note, and 2021 has so far been treating me very well (closing in on 300 paying customers). I guess I'm just tired and burned out, plus a little bit of arrival syndrome.

      I think I just badly need the rest yet can't just drop it now to go off skiing or something because there's just more and more work to do. I was on vacation last week, and the work just kept piling on, and I found myself working more than I should during my vacation. When I finally came back today, I don't even feel rested at all.

      1. 2

        Really appreciate you sharing so much of your struggles. :)

        I have a habit of checking my email anyway

        The good thing about habits is that you can change them. Nothing bad is going to happen if you only check your emails every 2 days.

        I've built a brand on stellar customer support

        Awesome! :)

        and if I fall back on that I feel like I'll be disappointing so many people

        1. Who is more important to you? Yourself or other people? Put your own well-being first. :)
        2. People won't be disappointed if it takes you a day to reply to their email. I've waited for replies for much longer than that and still used the product.

        If my app doesn't do what it promises to do, it's only right that I fix it ASAP, vacation or otherwise.

        Don't know about your app but if it's not time-critical, most users would probably be okay if you say: "I'm on vacation for a week. I'll fix this when I get back. To make up for the inconvenience, I've given you an extra free month on your subscription."

        Being a solo founder doesn't help either. It's me or nobody.

        If you cannot let go of the desire to check your emails, can you hire a virtual assistant to monitor your inbox for you and call you if something critical comes in?

        I guess I'm just tired and burned out

        Really sounds like it. And that's tough.

        Have you thought about getting professional help on this, e.g. through therapy? If not, I'd really encourage you to do so. Some things are hard to tackle alone. :)

        For a different perspective, I'd also recommend reading Tim Ferriss' "The 4-Hour Workweek". I can see so many parallels between your situation and what he describes in his book.

        You'll make it. Get help and don't give up. :)

        1. 3

          If you cannot let go of the desire to check your emails, can you hire a virtual assistant to monitor your inbox for you and call you if something critical comes in?

          This sounds like a good solution. I wouldn't expect a VA to know how to solve the problems in my inbox, but I think they'd know how to identify and classify emails and tell me about critical problems.

          Thanks for all your suggestions, and your time.

          1. 3

            Awesome! Happy to help. :)

  3. 3

    I agree with the other commenter who recommends a VA. Yeah, they're not experts like you, but not only can they learn to classify and sort emails (as you note), but you can also have them start developing a library of responses to standard questions. They could even go through your previous emails to figure out how to respond to some types of queries.

    I recently went through a period of lack of motivation. I'm pre-revenue, but I was also wondering if my ideas were worth pursuing (or pursuing further). One thing that really helped me out was reframing my ideas as questions. So for example, if your business currently helps homeowners maximize the rental income of their property on Airbnb (made-up example), you could focus on the question, "How can I help homeowners earn more money from their properties?" The point of the question is that it might (A) help you think of new directions you want to take your business, and (B) might remind you why you were inspired to work on this problem in the first place.

  4. 3

    First world problem.
    I think we depreciate our achievemts to soon. Typical hedonic treadmill. Nothing is enough, always wanting more and more. I find myself in your words. Have the same feeling pretty often

    1. 2

      Hey Roman, I'm glad you could relate.

      You're right, this is the Hedonic Treadmill Syndrome.

      Expectations keep rising even with success.

  5. 3

    I might be interested in running it as the a partner, sounds like what I'm looking. I have previous startup experience as a founder. Worked as a developer and growth manager in other companies too. Please contact me, we might be a good fit.

  6. 3

    Hey I think you're in the position I'm headed to in the future!

    Basically I'm working on a web app saas product and there's so much to do and I feel like I have to work 15 hour days just to stay afloat.

    It's like a saas product will be your key to freedom...freedom to work all hours a day?

    I'm considering quitting this project and just freelancing and making a blog...

    In your shoes...i think since you're making $$ you should try and automate as much of your work or outsource it. That way you might be investing some of your profits in hiring but you get a lot more time? But of course setting up these systems is effortful...

  7. 3

    If you're interested in selling, you have buyers on here. I'm interested. Ping me at my name on here @gmail.com

  8. 3

    do you want to sell your app i might be interested?

  9. 2

    I can't tell if you're trolling or not, but this:

    there's always some stupid email I have to deal with even when I'm swimming at a beach, skiing down a slope, or hiking up some pristine mountain.
    I don't know. Life sucks.

    Kinda makes me sick.

    Almost everyone who works is tied to email, or has even worse conditions. The chance to swim at a beach, ski down a slope or hike up some pristine mountain is something many people never get.

    You should appreciate how fortunate you are.

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