8
2 Comments

Getting Newsletter Feedback: Worth It

Getting feedback on your newsletter can feel, at times, like pulling teeth! And, despite the years of experience that I have building and launching email newsletters it doesn’t really get easier.

But, feedback, as we all know, is a fundamental part of building and launching anything, especially a newsletter!

You want to know what your readers are thinking, what they are reading (besides your stuff), and what they’d like to see more of in your issues and publication. Your readers are your community and they are the very heartbeat of your success — consequently, knowing what they know is paramount.

How Often Should You Ask for Feedback?

I always keep the proverbial “door open” but most folks never take the time to walk through — that’s fine, but, it’s important to note because this means that you, as the content creator and newsletter builder, will need to “poke” them (with love!) enough to get the valuable insights that you need.

I recommend, especially in the beginning, that you formally ask for feedback at least once a month — in the first few weeks of a completely new email newsletter, I lean in a bit more, just so that I’m calibrating the issues and delivery workflows, as well as content pacing and themes.

Naturally, there’s no guarantee that you’ll get much, if any, feedback! This is why you must programmatically plan for it (e.g. once a month) or you’ll miss out.

Here’s a recent piece of feedback that I got from one of my wonderful readers:

This both unusual and rare, but, if you commit to building a community, strongly, through your newsletter and if you start and don’t quit too early, you’ll start making a large impact on your reader’s lives and you’ll start seeing that value returned to you in-spades — your readers, community, and business depend on it!

Critical feedback is useful and is much more common. But, on occasion, I’ll get something overtly-positive and it already hits me pretty hard — mostly because getting positive feedback on your newsletter is more rare:

This one was a keeper:

First of all, one of the best mailing lists I am subscribed to. I find your writing very friendly and easy to connect to (feels like we are having a conversation).

You really create easy-to-read, pleasant content, and that’s awesome.

👆🏻 — It does make it all worth it though.

Bottom-line: You must treat your newsletter like an actual, digital product — which it is! In that way, you can iterate the content, form, and delivery so as to maximize your effectiveness and growth.

So schedule in feedback requests, sprinkle them into your newsletters every other week, and make sure to explicitly ask for it or you won’t get it!

  1. 2

    Thanks for sharing John. I'm looking to get started with a newsletter to the followers of my podcast, Beyond Normal Podcast. do I need to have a website to start this process? Currently I'm just sending individuals to the podcast streaming site.

    1. 2

      i think it's useful to have a landing page that you can control. but, a lot of folks start without one.

Trending on Indie Hackers
My year-long passion project is live on Product Hunt! Coffee Chats is like if Calendly and Carrd had a baby. 28 comments Happy to receive feedback about my new landing page 14 comments How much of the company should I give to cofounders? 14 comments Notion API Beta is Open. What are you going to build? 11 comments I am building the first side project in public - The Struggle of Idea 6 comments 14 eBook pre-orders in the last 48 hours! 5 comments