April 12, 2019

Most people think they know what they are good at. They are usually wrong

According to Peter F Drucker says in his book Managing Oneself, you should know what you are really good for, a person can only perform for strengths, don’t waste time making mediocre your weakness.

I found these 3 questions you should do in order to boost your team:

  • What should my contribution be?
  • What does the situation require?
  • Given my strengths, my way of performing, and my values, how can I make the greatest contribution to what needs to be done?

You can read my full summary here -> https://medium.com/read-smart/managing-oneself-e435550d1efb

#books #fyi

  1. 2

    I agree with doubling down on strengths and maximize your talents, but don't think you should outright avoid weaknesses.

    If you were to avoid your perceived weaknesses, you lose out on opportunities to grow. Like the attitude that "I'm not good at communicating with people" could lead your path in a constrained direction. That's a bit extreme and sort of my point on not being open to challenging your weaknesses. You still need some balance, especially at core skills.

    You may surprise yourself. I think you should give "weaknesses" a go a bit and see what you can do if you dive in at it for a week. I've surprised myself many times trying new areas I didn't think I had a talent for, and I'm way better for it, and it has opened up strengths I didn't know I had.

    1. 1

      That's true, we had the same conversation with my partners in the office the last day. I think that this suggestion can apply at the moment of deciding what you can do in a team in the daily basis, meanwhile, you can improve your weaknesses.

  2. 1

    Nice