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SEO Growth strategy – week 2: Content

SEO Growth strategy – week 2: Content

So now that I have my first keywords ready for WellyBox blog, it's time for content creation.

Finding a good writer was challenging! After a research on FIVERR, UPWORK, SURFERSEO and TEXTBROKER, we tried a few writers.

We now have 8 articles ready to be published (we haven't published them yet because our website is going through redesign and hopefully will be completed in a few days).

My concern is - the topics of our articles are too much alike because of our keywords options, for example:
“Organize receipts” and “track expenses” have quite a similar meaning, but search wise they are ranked differently.

Do you think the strategy of creating blog articles with different keywords but close topics is a good one? Or would you do something else?

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    Dor, I'm a little late to respond here, but the way we usually talk about this with clients is:

    Choose a few topics (not keywords, though in this case it's the same thing) that your brand can be an expert on. Then do whatever needs to be done to establish your authority for those topics – usually, this means multiple articles.

    In your example, I actually see "Organize receipts" and "track expenses" as having 2 very different meanings, and they're both topics that you could write a variety of articles on. It just so happens that your product solves for both of these :)

    But you could imagine an article on "Key benefits to tracking expenses", "Most efficient systems for tracking expenses", "How to implement an expense tracking system", and so on.

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      Thanks. Eventually, we did exactly that. You can take a look and give me your insights, it will be lovely:) Thanks for the comment.

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    Hey Dor,

    Where did you found your writer? Are you happy with the final results?

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      Hi,
      I was actually looking into your product yesterday. looks very interesting.
      I found 6 writers from Upwork, Fiverr, SurferSEO, and TextBroker (I had a bad experience with them). I'm happy with the results of 2 of them, and only with them I'll continue. They are from Upwork and surfer.
      The problem is they are more expensive than the others, so now I'm thinking about a package for reducing costs.

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        How expensive?
        Are you paying per word or how are you paying them?

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        Hi Dor,

        Thanks for sharing your experience. For the 2 writers that you're happy with, how much are the writers charging per word/article?

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          It depends, I would say you can find fine writers at 10c/w but 20c/w+ are mostly much better, writing like "poetry". But your needs is an important factor here.

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            If you guys are not happy with your current writers, I am actually curating a network of expert writers and connect businesses with them for free. We spend quite a bit of time vetting the quality. Check it out. www.theravenry.com

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              Will take a look, thanks.

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    Hey Dor,

    It's not bad to rank for similar keywords with different articles, actually I aim for one main keyword per article - all additional keywords are a benefit. This being said it can get "too close". You can (and should) still watch out if your articles cannibalize each other (rank high for the same keyword). Check a month or two after you published the articles in Search Console if your articles rank for the same keywords and tweak them if needed.

    Peter

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    Hi Dor,
    did you use any method to organise your keywords and so the content? Based on you post looks like you're working on something like a blog where you publish content based on your keywords.

    I'm not saying that this approach is wrong, and it works for many. But from your post I understand that you want more remarkable results.

    Writing about different/similar topics without a relevant strategy around it can bring you to spend more time to get some results (given that the content is good).

    What I'd suggest you is to organise your keywords in different buckets to identify a theme. Once the theme is defined write an overview page of the theme.
    When you have your overview, each section should be a short description of the specific task to be managed, and so you can prioritise your articles where you provide a guide for each activity.

    For example (at a very high level), in your previous post you mentioned your target audience are freelance and small businesses. These two audiences have very different ways to organise their finances and expenses. Each of them worth a specific guide on how they should organise their payments with suppliers, employees, software, gears, etc.

    Be very specific about activities for the different target audiences. From the overview page link to the specific guides, and from the specific guides link back to your guide.

    This should give you more chance to rank more quickly, bear in mind that your keyword research should be also planned on this strategy.

    Hope it helps!

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      Hi Francesco,
      Liked your plan. This is exactly what we're gonna do next after we'll publish the current content we have about the core of our product.
      Do you have any Ideas for buckets? I want to be sure I understand your approach.

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        Hi Dor,
        buckets depend on the specific audience you have. As you already performed part of your keyword research, I'd suggest to capitalise it.
        Take your current keywords and think who's the audience for that, and what kind of guide do they need.

        The freelancer/small business guides are an option, but are also very high level. You can start with (i.e.:) the small business startup costs to list all the expenses and guide owners through it, what hiring employees means and all the papers and expenses a business owner needs, the hidden costs of a freelancers/small business, etc.
        These are just random ideas, but I'm sure based on your experience you can get more of them.

        Last but not least, my advice is to not use the blog to publish your content, at least not in a standard format. Rather create some "content areas" where you can develop your pages and structure them based on your needs.

        Have a look at this for an overview https://www.contentharmony.com/blog/content-hubs/

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          Thanks for the in-depth comments.
          Not sure I understand "my advice is to not use the blog to publish your content, at least not in a standard format. Rather create some "content areas" where you can develop your pages and structure them based on your needs".
          But for sure will have a look at this link

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            What I mean is that with blog people do expect daily/weekly/whatever posts, while here you should be evergreen and not focused on posting every X days.

            On the other hand the (default) structure of a blog platform is not good for defining your internal linking structure as it creates posts, next/prev, categories, etc. Here you want to decide how the whole structure should work what to link where and how.

            One additional reason that with content areas (i.e.: pages) you can use Google Analytics for Content Grouping and analyse the results of your content.

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